Working at the car wash (oh oh, yeah yeah)

They have managed to find another job to do that’s more interesting than putting up a building!

Welcome to the really-quite-rusty-and-not-particularly-shiny new Salisbury Road Car Wash!!!

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Previously the truck had to stand on the ground, so couldn’t get the bottom of his socks properly rinsed off. Problem solved!

They do seem to be having a bit of a problem with the mud. They did make another stunning attempt to solve the problem. Last week they laid tarmac over the middle of the site where all the delivery trucks go. If the delivery trucks didn’t have to get their feet muddy, then the mud wouldn’t spread, right? After all, there aren’t any other vehicles that might need to cross the tarmac, thereby spreading the mud.

That worked beautifully while it was lovely and dry and they didn’t need to worry about the mud anyway.

Then it rained.

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The bit between the red lines is roughly where their very nice black tarmac is.

Buried under the mud. Already.

Well that worked. Good job guys.

P.S. On a different topic, someone eventually noticed how bad the University sign over the folly looked. They’ve fixed it! Yay!

What happens if you drill too far?

This is a serious drill.
(Ed — it’s an auger, surely?)

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Now that’s going to make a pretty deep hole, by anyone’s standards.

So what happens if you drill too far? What comes out?
Your options are

  1. Water
  2. Oil
  3. Molten rock
  4. Australians

Your answers on a postcard, please. As in all good competitions, everyone entering stands a chance of winning a £10 Amazon gift voucher*.

To prove it does actually go as deep as you think, here’s it just before it gets to the bottom.

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Not a lot of drill-bit left.

It’s quite a cool machine. First it drills the hole, then the concrete factory on the far end of that hose starts up:

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The hose is connected to the top of the drill-bit (Ed – “auger”, I keep telling you!) which is hollow. As the bit is screwed back out the ground, the concrete is pumped out the bottom end of the bit, filling the hole with concrete.

To polish it off, there are 2 sets of rotating brushes in front of the cab that scrub all the mud off the bit as it comes out. Nice clean drill bit! (Ed — “auger”, FFS!)

*An extremely small chance, much less than 1 in the-number-of-people-who-enter. But a chance, nonetheless.

P.S. Now you can’t un-see that photo either. Don’t blame me, blame Twitter. If it’s going to be stuck in my head forever, it’s going to be stuck in yours too.

Burying the bodies

Last week, our ace roller-driver made the entire site look like a bowling green (or was that croquet lawn? I forget now…). As a reminder, here he is at an early stage of the ironing:

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And the watering-the-ground bloke had a pretty much permanent job. He was watering the ground so slowly that it was evaporating as fast as he could water it. Fortunately water’s cheap; he might as well as have been just spraying it into the air. And he was totally failing to make any decent quantity of mud, though that was presumably the main aim.

Well, after last night’s storm(s) I think they probably have enough mud for quite a while. The drainage of that site is remarkably good, and it didn’t flood at all. Not even the mass graves they dug yesterday!

Presumably for the sole reason of pissing off the roller guy, they dug up the exact bit of ground he’s carefully ironing in the photo above!

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So much for colleagues appreciating the effort you put into your job. I’m sure ironing building sites is a very respected profession, and his work mates really don’t seem to care.

Their organisation is pretty impressive though. None of this “randomly toss the bodies into the hole” lark that the amateurs do. No, these guys have installed a flight of stairs so they can carefully position each body for maximum capacity. That’s what I call attention to detail.

Presumably by the end of the week they’ll have their (by then probably depressed) workmate come and iron it all flat again.

Other than that, most of the current “activity” is almost everyone else doing the arduous job of standing around with their arms crossed while watching the digger move mud around. That must be truly exhausting.

We must have more mud.

making mud

Damn this dry weather. Building sites are supposed to be mud swamps. Like Glastonbury on a very slightly damp year.

Fortunately, we have the benefit of a tank from our sponsors Brendon Bowsers, an  advanced pressure supply and delivery nozzle, along with a highly trained and professionally certified Dihydrogen Monoxide Redistribution Technician.

And, like all workers using hazardous chemicals, he is being sure to wear a hard hat (in case any of the chemical should hit his head) and hopefully hermetically sealed boots to ensure his tootsies don’t get wet.

As you can see from the ground around him, he has been at it for a while already. Hopefully by the end of the afternoon, much of the site will have been soaked in this highly dangerous chemical and it will be restored to its correct muddy state. If this weather keeps up, he’s got a good reliable job here.