Burying the bodies

Last week, our ace roller-driver made the entire site look like a bowling green (or was that croquet lawn? I forget now…). As a reminder, here he is at an early stage of the ironing:

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And the watering-the-ground bloke had a pretty much permanent job. He was watering the ground so slowly that it was evaporating as fast as he could water it. Fortunately water’s cheap; he might as well as have been just spraying it into the air. And he was totally failing to make any decent quantity of mud, though that was presumably the main aim.

Well, after last night’s storm(s) I think they probably have enough mud for quite a while. The drainage of that site is remarkably good, and it didn’t flood at all. Not even the mass graves they dug yesterday!

Presumably for the sole reason of pissing off the roller guy, they dug up the exact bit of ground he’s carefully ironing in the photo above!

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So much for colleagues appreciating the effort you put into your job. I’m sure ironing building sites is a very respected profession, and his work mates really don’t seem to care.

Their organisation is pretty impressive though. None of this “randomly toss the bodies into the hole” lark that the amateurs do. No, these guys have installed a flight of stairs so they can carefully position each body for maximum capacity. That’s what I call attention to detail.

Presumably by the end of the week they’ll have their (by then probably depressed) workmate come and iron it all flat again.

Other than that, most of the current “activity” is almost everyone else doing the arduous job of standing around with their arms crossed while watching the digger move mud around. That must be truly exhausting.

Dig them. Fill them. Dig them…

23 Jun 2017

They’re bored of their shiny red fencing already. They’ve filled in all the holes they dug yesterday.

The great bit is that what you see there as the ground level isn’t. The actual ground level of the building is 10 feet lower down. So they keep beautifully smoothing out the site every time they leave a tyre track mark on it. What they haven’t realised yet is they have to dig out the entire site to a depth of 10 feet before anyone can build anything.

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